Game Data Live Network - Access Point- TP-LINK


TP-Link CPE510 Access Point Setup

Game Data Live Networks use Access Points to add capacity and speed. An Access Point is basically a WiFi radio that attaches to your router with an ethernet cable. You can use Access Points to provide a WiFi signal closer to your iPad. WiFi works faster and with less interference over shorter distances. You can provide power to an Access Point over the ethernet cable using a device called a Power Over Ethernet (POE) injector. This particular access point is called the CPE510 from TP-LINK. It comes with its own Power Over Ethernet injector.

The TP-LINK CPE510 provides lots of functionality. It can be configured as an access point or a variety of other devices. It has a web based configuration system. To configure it, the first thing you have to do is communicate with it. By factory default, you can get to that configuration system at http://192.168.0.254 with a web browser. Before you can do that, you'll likely have to manually set the IP Address for your computer in the 192.168.0.x range where x is any number from 2 up to 253. On a Macintosh, you can do this using System Preferences / Network and it would look as follows:

Connect the TP-LINK CPE510 directly to your computer using an ethernet cable. On the CPE510, use the connector that is next to the ground screw.

Enter "http://192.168.0.254" in your web browser to access the TP-LINK CPE510 configuration web site.

You should see something like :

The factory defaults for User Name and Password are "admin". Enter "admin" for both.

Under the Network tab, you can change the static IP address for this CPE510 to something that is easy to use and remember. My router assumes its network uses the 192.168.1.X address space, so I changed the CPE510's address to be 192.168.1.200. That looks like this:

After you click on Apply, you'll lose your connection to the TP-Link because its address is out of your space.

Now, reconnect your computer to your Game Data Live Router and connect the TP-LINK CPE510 to the router with an ethernet cable. Set your computer back to getting its IP address from the router with DHCP. On a Macintosh - use System Preferences / Network to use DHCP. It should look like this when you're done.

Now you can enter http://192.168.1.200 into your web browser to get access to the CPE510 configuration web site again.

You'll want to change the password to something that works for you. You'll find that under the System Tab.

You will also find the Firmware Update on the System Tab. If your firmware is not version 1.3.3 or later, you can download the latest firmware from TP-Link's website and then upload it to the device from your computer. Version 1.3.3 give you more WiFi channels and Mac Address Filtering works too.

If the Operation Mode is not already set to Access Point - Set it to Access Point.

Switch to the Wireless Tab to setup the wireless settings. When you're done, they should look like:

Mode = 802.11n

Channel Width can be 20 MHz or 20/40 MHz. 20 works better at longer distances. 20/40 works faster at shorter distances. We use 20/40 for home games and 20 for away games.

Max TX Rate should be set to the maximum available.

Channel / Frequency = 149. Channel 149 works the best.

Set Transmit Power to Maximum

Do not enable MAXtream - your iPad does not know how to speak MAXtream.

Give your CPE510 a name or SSID. I start my names with Z so they end up at the bottom of the list on cell phones.

Enable SSID Broadcast so your iPads can see the Access Point's name.

Turn on Security and give your CPE510 a password.

For extra security you can enable Wireless Mac Filtering. This lets you create an exclusive list of MAC addresses that are allowed to connect to the Access Point. You can find the WiFi MAC address for your iPhone / iPad by using the Settings app, look under General and About. This feature did not work properly with firmware before version 1.3.3.

Distance Setting = 0.1 kilometers. Auto should not be turned on. That should work at home and away.

Turn on Transmit Beamforming.

At a game, mount the TP-LINK outside the press box as high as you can. Getting it up higher provides a clearer path to the side line and gets it farther away from the cell phones.